Average Playtime: 3 hours

Dark Parables: The Swan Princess and The Dire Tree Collector's Edition

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About

In a land far away lies the Swan Kingdom. Ruled by the Swan Princess, this prosperous community exists to protect the mythical Dire Tree, root of all life. Every year Goddess Flora would hold a ceremony here, using the magical seed to regenerate the land and grant new life. However, this year the seed gets stolen by the nefarious Black Swan, delaying the ceremony. Thus the Swan Princess decides to call in the famous Fairytale Detective.

As you delve deeper into the case, you'll realize things aren't as black and white. Following the crumbs of conspiracy, you'll finally realize that the person responsible for it all wishes to ascend to godhood.

• Soundtracks, wallpapers and concept art
• Unlockable Parables to read
• Achievements and collectibles
• Integrated strategy guide
• Replayable HO's and puzzles
Platforms
Release date
Developer
Eipix Entertainment
Publisher
Big Fish Games
Age rating
Not rated

System requirements for PC

Minimum:
  • OS: Windows XP/Windows Vista/Windows 7/Windows 8/Windows 10
  • Processor: 2.0 GHz
  • Memory: 1024 MB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 9.0
  • Storage: 1015 MB available space
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Last Modified: Aug 28, 2019

Where to buy

Steam

Top contributors

Sinkler

1 edit
105
100.00%
Swift Feet
Use fast travel via the map one time.
0.00%
Sage
Collect all parables.
0.00%
Sign Collector
Collect all hidden signs.
0.00%
Ultimate Eye
Find six objects in 8 seconds.
0.00%
Precision
Finish a HOP without any mistakes.
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12 items

Dark Parables: The Swan Princess and The Dire Tree Collector's Edition reviews and comments

Translated by
Microsoft from Italian
It does Not want to be a normal review, but a small vent on this collection of FHO (Fragmented Hidden Objects: The parts where you have to look for hidden stuff work by going to search for pieces identified graphically at the bottom, unlike the more traditional I have where you look for objects through their names). I Had positively assessed the first and I came slowly to this. It Was useless to write a comment for every single title: In the end it is a very pleasant collection with many beautiful sequences of Intermezzo. As always it comes to the end of graphic adventures, without choice of dialogues, but facing essentially small puzzles, which are often really without a real sense: to go forward the goal is always to find a key that opens a door. Almost always not literally, that is, the key is an object that must be placed in a missing position to open a passage (from this point of view, the inventive step is zero). It goes by chance because there are often no logical links: Caghi on the ground, grows a tree that produces crowns, use the crown on the statue that gives you the sceptre, then you have to use as a Sturacessi (before you have to attack on a mouse tail) to clean a bottle. You only do it because they are the only actions that you can do, otherwise it would be trouble, in a traditional adventure. But What is the rash? Sometimes there are mini-games, which are the cancer of these titles, because they are essentially Enigmystic Week stuff. Now... As long as they are simple is fine, but when, as in this episode, you have to deal with a sequence of the Games of infinite spins (or the variants in which you have to do shifts changing the adjacent configurations)... Well, I didn't make it and I started skipping (luckily you can). That Is, imagine twisted chess in which there are objects that need to be accommodated in some reported cells. It's Not the game of 15 (maybe, with everything that that game is a conceptual porcata), but the game that "selects the object and the adjacent squares revolve, rotating the adjacent pieces". Now, at some point there is a version in which you are so forced to err and not understand a cippa (because it is impossible to go planning: it is boring) that the only thing you can do is to make random moves (but imagining that they can give a result). After The fiftieth move, you realise that you have returned to the way the chessboard started. And the game is here. Quittando the puzzle is self-facing in front of your eyes. In one case it was like 20 seconds to self-healing: I was amazed. I Mean, I was in ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ to the neck and I would never get out? Stop, just please, just take the shit out of these games. 4/10 for scarring. I still have to finish it, but I want to enjoy lowering the average vote.
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