Average Playtime: 2 hours

Drew and the Floating Labyrinth

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About

"I just want to go home..."

A hand-drawn 3D third-person puzzle-platformer. Control Drew, a lost young girl trying to find her way back home, through a series of abstract levels requiring you to use clues in the environment to find invisible paths, gaining color to her black-and-white character as you progress.

  • Featuring traditional animation in a fully third-person 3D environment, showing the possibilities of image-based animation (not relying on 3D models) in any type of game.
  • Basic, challenging, yet not frustrating, requiring patience and observation. Consists of short invisible platforming levels using a variety of visual clues to help the player find their way to the end of each environment, requiring you to look before you leap.
  • Simple story leading to an emotional conclusion.
Platforms
Release date
Developer
Dust Scratch Games
Publisher
Dust Scratch Games
Age rating
Not rated
Website
http://drew.fromdustscratch.com

System requirements for Linux

Minimum:
  • OS: Ubuntu 10.10 or greater
  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 3000
  • Storage: 2400 MB available space

System requirements for macOS

Minimum:
  • OS: Mac OS X 10.6 or greater
  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 3000
  • Storage: 2400 MB available space

System requirements for PC

Minimum:
  • OS: Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 or later, 32-bit or 64-bit
  • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 3000
  • DirectX: Version 9.0
  • Storage: 2400 MB available space
  • Additional Notes: Supports keyboard only, keyboard and mouse, or game controller input.
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Last Modified: Aug 28, 2019

Where to buy

Steam

Top contributors

Sinkler

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Drew and the Floating Labyrinth reviews and comments

Translated by
Microsoft from French
There are many kinds of games. Those who are bad, generic, awesome, epic, long... Drew is part of these games with good ideas, but by his limited mechanics, when the dévs do not end up digging infinitely the bottom of their skull, end up being ephemeral and fordable. Not recommending it would however deny that I did not have fun. Let's peel off the beast. A small cube... Through a third person perspective and a free camera to the mouse, one embodies a little girl in a world-maze that will serve as a pretext for classical levels of puzzle-plateforming: go from A to B using what one has learned. Why it is there and why it is tormented, you will discover it as the Narrator decides to tell you a little more. And guess what? Yes, she's amnesiac. In short, forget the scenario, and at the same time, remove the number of levels that serve only as "narrative support"-one walks, it tells-and tutorials levels, to get about fifty small levels. Some are expeditive, others more greedy – we will block about ten minutes at best. All 5-10 levels we introduce you a new mechanics and on the last ten you make a potpourri, history to actually make the thing a little more pungent, alas, too late. ... a big cube... The first introduced mechanics is so snoring that I almost stopped the game and put a red thumb in thinking it was the only one. The cubes that make up the maze and that illuminate only beneath your feet display one or more coloured faces; clear, blindly follow the direction directed by the face in question to join the cube of the color mentioned. We imagine that the dévs could clearly have truncated this aspect of the game but at the risk of further diminishing the life of the title – it will become to the rigor a little more interesting afterwards in combination with the other mechanics. http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=486586358 Fortunately, the rest saves the bet. We have these levels where some cube-indices will display "maps" of the labyrinth, always invisible, and we then have fun to memorize the patterns of cubes before you can join the next cubes-indices. And where it gets interesting is that the game exploits the x, y and z axes: to you to nest it all in space – I hadn't told you, drew can jump. http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=486585233 sometimes the clues will be displayed in the form of shadows, on the faces that represents the background, but suddenly we lose the information on the third axis. Example: I look at the shadow of the maze on the right projection, I think I have to go straight ahead and I fall. In fact, it was also necessary to take a look at the projection of the shadow at the bottom to realize that the next cube was located a notch on the left, which could not be reported the first. It will also happen that the maze tracks the cubes that pave it temporarily, or even only some of their faces. http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=404981993... It's time for the laby-cube. In the end, despite the 2 small hours of play and the few moments devoid of great interest or challenge, drew arrives to amuse: the games of observation and memorization in space and the genre of the platform make an excellent mix. It will only be regretted that the fun has only finally reached its climax so late and that the little melancholic notes at the piano tirelessly repeated eventually make us cut the audio. This article is also available on game side story. [www.gamesidestory.com] game side story, is a dedicated Association and a site that gives you another look at the news of the video game, and all this without advertisements.
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